Hampshire Cultural Trust

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CITY MUSEUM POP-UP SHOP PROVIDES A PLATFORM FOR INDEPENDENT HAMPSHIRE MAKERS AND PRODUCERS

A pop-up shop giving local makers, food producers and artists a platform to promote and sell their goods in Winchester has opened at the City Museum.

Made in Hampshire is a Hampshire Cultural Trust Arts Council England funded project to give independent suppliers and creatives space to promote themselves in the heart of the city in the run-up to Christmas.

Hampshire Cultural Trust has worked closely with many partners, including Hampshire Fare, to bring together more than 30 local artisans on the ground floor of the City Museum. From Christmas puddings to ceramics, chocolates, jewellery and prints, a wide range of produce and goods is available to browse and buy. There is also an in-house coffee shop, family-run Flat Whites’, whose vintage coffee van is a regular feature on Winchester’s Market Street.

The shop will be open until the end of the year, and there is a full programme of tastings, talks, demonstrations and more to enjoy, all of which are free. Visitors to the shop can also enter a competition to be in with a chance of winning a three-course meal and overnight stay for two at the award-winning King’s Head in Hursley.

While the pop-up shop occupies the museum ground floor, the top two floors, with galleries celebrating Winchester’s Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon past, are open to visit as usual. At the end of December, the shop will close its doors, and the museum will also close fully for major refurbishment works to be completed in advance of the arrival of Roger Brown’s model of Victorian Winchester in 2017, and also to make good the lift for disabled access.

For opening times, please visit www.hampshireculturaltrust.org.uk. Admission to the museum is free.

WINCHESTER AND ALTON HOARDS RETURN TO HAMPSHIRE IN A STUNNING NEW EXHIBTION AT WINCHESTER DISCOVERY CENTRE

The Winchester and Alton Hoards return to Hampshire in Births, Battles and Beheadings, a stunning new exhibition celebrating the county’s glorious royal past at the Gallery in Winchester’s Discovery Centre.

The exquisite Winchester Hoard was discovered in a field near the city in 2000, and consists of two sets of elaborate, Iron Age gold jewellery, each set comprising a necklace torc, bracelet and two brooches linked with a chain. This is only the second time that the hoard has been on display in its home county, and only the fourth time nationally since its discovery.

The Alton Hoard also dates from the Iron Age, and a gold ring, bracelet and 20 representative gold ‘staters’, or coins, are a highlight of the exhibition. The hoard was discovered in 1996, and has not previously been on show outside the British Museum, which has loaned both hoards to the Hampshire Cultural Trust, the exhibition’s organiser.

Births, Battles and Beheadings focuses on six pivotal periods in Hampshire’s history. From the Iron Age through to the Anglo-Saxons, Tudors and Stuarts, each period is explored through a spectacular array of objects and artefacts, some of which are on public display for the very first time. Amongst those pieces making their public debut are a pendant found near Odiham which belonged to the influential Despenser family; 120 silver coins hidden in a cottage in Dummer during the Civil War, and a stunning 700 year-old gold, sapphire and garnet ring acquired for the Winchester City Council collection this year.

The exhibition will also feature the Monk Sherborne Buckle, one of the finest pieces of Anglo-Saxon craftsmanship to have been found in Hampshire, and a rare Byzantine pail discovered at Breamore, one of only three of its type in Britain.

Also on display will be eight costumes representing the different historical periods, which have been designed and made especially for the exhibition in a collaboration with theatre costume design students from Bournemouth University.

“We are absolutely thrilled to be staging this remarkable exhibition,” commented Janet Owen, Chief Executive Officer of Hampshire Cultural Trust.

“It has given us a unique opportunity not only to bring the Winchester and Alton Hoards back to their home county, but also to showcase some of the spectacular objects found in Hampshire which belong to both the Hampshire County Council and Winchester City Council collections, cared for by Hampshire Cultural Trust.”

Births, Battles and Beheadings is part of Royal Blood: The fight for power in Hampshire, Hampshire Cultural Trust’s year-long, county-wide programme of exhibitions, performances and events exploring the county’s long and illustrious royal history. Admission to the exhibition is free, and it can be seen at the Gallery, Winchester Discovery Centre from Saturday 5 November until Sunday 8 January 2017. Also at Winchester Discovery Centre as part of Royal Blood is City Under Siege, an exhibition telling the story of Winchester’s defences from the Romans right through to the Civil War. Admission is also free, and the exhibition runs until 4 December.

JANE AUSTEN 200: A YEAR PACKED WITH EXHIBITIONS, TALKS, WALKS, WRITING COMPETITIONS, PERFORMANCES AND MUCH MORE

Jane Austen by Cassandra Austen. Pencil and watercolour, circa 1810 (c) National Portrait Gallery, London

2017 marks the 200th anniversary of the death of globally loved author Jane Austen – and Hampshire Cultural Trust is coordinating a yearlong series of events across the historic and beautiful county to celebrate her creativity and talent.

Hampshire was not only Jane Austen’s birthplace (and where you can visit her grave today), but its people, landscape and the society in which she moved provided inspiration for her novels, classics such as Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Mansfield Park and Sense and Sensibility. From a landmark exhibition to talks and walks, from picnics to performances, 2017 will be a very special celebration of her life, times and work.

Sure to be a highlight of the celebrations is the exhibition The Mysterious Miss Austen, which opens on 13 May 2017 (until 24 July) at The Gallery in Winchester Discovery Centre, before travelling to the Gallery at Gosport Discovery Centre and the Sainsbury Gallery at Basingstoke’s Willis Museum.

This unique exhibition, presented in partnership with Jane Austen’s House Museum, will explore Jane’s life, work and her relationship to Hampshire. The centrepiece will be five portraits of Jane together under one roof for the very first time – including two works from the National Portrait Gallery, London and three from private collections, one of which has not been seen in public for more than 40 years.

The Mysterious Miss Austen will also include a surviving manuscript of an alternative ending to her final novel Persuasion, in her own hand (on loan from the British Library). There will also be a silk pelisse coat (one of the only garments in the world with a provenance that can be traced back to Jane), first editions of her works and fascinating personal letters. Bringing a contemporary view, Grayson Perry’s Jane Austen in E17 vase is evidence of her lasting legacy and influence on the arts.

Set to be a ‘deliciously’ popular feature of Jane Austen 200 are the Big Picnics. These feasts of fun and nibbley gorgeousness will be held at significant locations throughout Hampshire. At these events, visitors will have the opportunity to enjoy Regency delicacies, watch performances and, of course, learn about this amazing, world-renowned writer.  Bringing a very 21st century slant to the proceedings, Hampshire Cultural Trust will be creating a downloadable picnic pack that will inspire bakers and ‘Janeites’ to unite and create their own Regency-style Bake Off.

Much as there will only ever be one Jane Austen, Hampshire Cultural Trust passionately believes that Jane’s work still inspires excellent writing today. To find not only the next great literary talent, HCT has created a brand new competition for children and adults, with two categories; short story and letter. Grown-ups need to submit a short story of 2017 words, based on Jane’s classic quote from Mansfield Park: “Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there’s no hope of a cure”. Youngsters are invited to write a letter of 400 words based on ‘A day in the life,’ real or imagined. Entries for both have just opened (and close 28 February 2017). 

Actor Hugh Bonneville, star of Downton Abbey, and of course, the 1999 film of Mansfield Park is a Hampshire man and says: As a local and as a fan of Jane Austen, I hope you will join us in Hampshire in 2017 to get to know a bit more about the woman behind the novels. We have a great year ahead, packed with regency celebrations, talks, arts installations and so on. So please google Jane Austen 200 and come and join in the fun.”

Janet Owen, Chief Executive of Hampshire Cultural Trust, echoes Hugh’s invitation: “Jane Austen has been a much-loved figure worldwide for more than two centuries, so we are pulling out all the stops to celebrate her life and works here in Hampshire. Whether you are a Jane Austen scholar or have just enjoyed one of the many TV or film adaptations of her works we will have something for everyone, young and old, to celebrate her legacy.”

This is just a small handful of the events taking place for Jane Austen 200, for the latest news and information visit www.janeausten200.co.uk.

 

 

The Renaissance Choir celebrates its 40th anniversary

Concert: “French Connection: Poulenc’s Gloria”.

St Peter's Church, Petersfield, Petersfield, GU32 3HS, Saturday 29th October 2016 at 7:30pm

 

The Renaissance Choir, conducted by Peter Gambie, will be bringing a gorgeous programme of classical music to St Peter's Church, Petersfield, on 29th October.

Besides performing a selection of selection of French and English choral music, including Poulenc’s skittish Gloria, the Choir will perform the second ever performance of a commission it made to mark its 40th anniversary to Hampshire-based composer Ian Schofield entitled "Stream of Life" containing poetry by Rabindranath Tagore.

The Renaissance Choir was honoured early last year by the Portsmouth-Based newspaper, The News, when it won Best Classical Music Act. Mentioned in the citation for the award was a performance during which the spell-bound audience was captivated by the choir’s sensuous sound and musicianship.

The Choir has a considerable reputation, delighting audiences across Europe with the blend and beauty of its sound.  Recent concert tours to Budapest (2006), Lisbon (2008), Krakow, Poland (2010), Santiago de Compostela, Spain (2014) and most recently in May this year to Rome have been highly successful.

For a programme not to be missed, the concert on Saturday 29th October begins at 7.30pm, and tickets are £12 (concessions £10, students £2). These are available by phoning 023 9247 5259, by visiting www.renaissancechoir.org.uk, or can be obtained on the door.

 

 

 

ROGER BROWN MODEL OF VICTORIAN WINCHESTER FINDS A LONG-TERM HOME AT WINCHESTER CITY MUSEUM

The Roger Brown model of Victorian Winchester is to be given a permanent home at Winchester City Museum.

Measuring over 15 feet and made up of 20 component parts, the impressive scale model is based on the first Ordinance Survey map of the city from 1873, and took former town planner Roger Brown nine years to create following his retirement from Hampshire County Council. Since its completion in the 1980s, the model has been on temporary display at a number of locations in and around Winchester, but this is the first time it has been given a permanent home.

The project is being championed by many prominent local supporters including travel writer and photographer, John Pilkington, who worked with Roger Brown in the Hampshire County Council planning office. He commented:

“Roger Brown was a warm and extremely generous man. The contribution he made to Hampshire’s towns and countryside was immense, but the model also shows his grasp of history and incredible eye for detail. People are going to be amazed and inspired!”

Although the project has received significant funding from Hampshire County Council, Winchester City Council and Winchester Town Forum, Hampshire Cultural Trust (HCT), who operate Winchester City Museum, are launching a major campaign to raise further funds to secure the future of the model, and will be reaching out to local businesses and donors for their support.

After being in storage for a number of years, the model is undergoing extensive restoration by HCT’s highly-skilled conservation team, and will be brought to life by new digital interpretation. Along with the objects on display in the museum, the model will tell the story of Winchester, orientating visitors by taking them through the Victorian streets and introducing them to the city’s rich heritage from King Alfred to Jane Austen.

The ground floor of Winchester City Museum will undergo extensive refurbishment in two phases in order to accommodate the model. The ground floor of the museum will close to the public on Monday 3 October, with full closure from Monday 10 October, to allow conservators from HCT to remove current exhibits for conservation and storage during the refurbishment.

On Saturday 22 October, the museum will re-open to the public for the half-term holiday and Christmas period, with the galleries on the top two floors celebrating Winchester’s Roman and Iron Age past open to visitors as usual. The ground floor will be dedicated to Made in Hampshire, an HCT project which receives Arts Council England (ACE) funding. This pilot phase of the Made in Hampshire project will take the form of a pop-up shop, giving local makers and producers a platform to promote and sell their goods in the city during the festive period. The museum will close fully at the end of 2016 so that refurbishment work can be completed before the model is installed, with full re-opening planned for the end of March 2017.

Janet Owen, Chief Executive of Hampshire Cultural Trust, commented:

‘The Roger Brown model is a unique record of our city in Victorian times. Roger Brown completed the model in the 1980s after nine years of personal dedication, but, despite being on temporary display at a number of locations, a permanent site has never been found.

‘We are absolutely thrilled that we now have the opportunity to give this extraordinary work - made by a man with real vision and love for the heritage of Winchester - a permanent home in the heart of the community at the Winchester City Museum. The museum is the ideal place for the model to be housed, and combined with our exciting plans for the-design of the ground floor, which will incorporate objects from Jane Austen’s personal items to stories of the trades people of Winchester, we will be creating an exceptional visitor experience for local people and tourists alike.’

Details of how to donate to the Roger Brown model can be found at www.hampshireculturaltrust.org.uk/RogerBrownModel.

 

 

HEALTHWATCH HAMPSHIRE FUNDS POETRY PROJECT FOR PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA AND THEIR CARERS

 

 

Healthwatch Hampshire is supporting the Better Life Chances team, part of Hampshire Cultural Trust, to help improve wellbeing and gather feedback of mental health users with the use of a Community Cash Fund (CCF) of up to £2,500. The feedback collected will be used to influence service providers and improve outcomes for local communities, particularly within mental health services.

The Better Life Chances team will focus on people with dementia and their carers, holding a series of sessions led by a poet who will use poetry to express personal experience of mental health services. The words and responses will be captured by the artist and brought together into poetry for Healthwatch Hampshire to share with service providers.

Over the past two years, Healthwatch Hampshire has funded nearly 30 projects, gathering feedback of service users from seldom heard groups. Their work has been recognised nationally, winning an award for ‘The value we bring to our community’ in June. This year, they are working on a smaller number of projects which focus specifically on mental health services. These projects have been picked to help improve mental health services for the groups.

Steve Manley, manager at Healthwatch Hampshire, says, “Our Community Cash Fund allows citizens to develop their own voice and, with our support, share their work, findings, recommendations and innovative projects with local commissioners and providers. We recognise the power of using skills, experience and existing networks of our communities throughout the county to harness their participation and involvement in health and social care related services.”

BIRTHS, BATTLES AND BEHEADINGS EXHIBITION AT THE WILLIS MUSEUM CELEBRATES HAMPSHIRE'S GLORIOUS ROYAL PAST

 

The Breamore Pail

A stunning new exhibition celebrating Hampshire’s glorious royal history opened on Saturday 3 September at the Willis Museum in Basingstoke.

Births, Battles and Beheadings, part of the county-wide Royal Blood programme for 2016, focusses on seven pivotal periods in Hampshire’s history. From the Iron Age through to the Anglo-Saxons, Tudors and Stuarts, each period is explored through interactives, specially commissioned costumes and a spectacular array of objects and artefacts, some of which will be on public display for the very first time.

Amongst those pieces which will make their public debut at the exhibition, are an elaborate roman buckle; a pendant which belonged to the influential Despenser family and which was found near Odiham and 120 silver coins hidden in a cottage in Dummer during the Civil War.

The exhibition will also feature the Alton Hoard, a collection of Iron Age coins and Roman jewellery on loan from the British Museum; the Monk Sherborne Buckle, one of the finest pieces of Anglo-Saxon craftsmanship to have been found in Hampshire, and a rare Byzantine pail discovered at Breamore, one of only three of its type in Britain.

Also on display will be eight costumes, representing the different historical periods, which have been made especially for the exhibition in a collaboration with theatre costume design students from Bournemouth University.

“We are absolutely thrilled to be staging this remarkable exhibition,” commented Janet Owen, Chief Executive Officer of the Hampshire Cultural Trust.

“It has given us a unique opportunity to showcase some of the spectacular objects found in Hampshire and which belong to both the Hampshire County Council and Winchester City Council collections, which are cared for by Hampshire Cultural Trust.”

Births, Battles and Beheadings is part of Royal Blood: The fight for power in Hampshire, Hampshire Cultural Trust’s year-long, county-wide programme of exhibitions, performances and events, exploring the county’s long and illustrious royal history. Admission to the exhibition is free, and it can be seen at the Willis Museum from Saturday 3 September until Saturday 29 October, when it will move to the Gallery at Winchester Discovery Centre from Saturday 5 November.

 

CHILDREN USE DRAMA TO BRING MILESTONES MUSEUM TO LIFE IN A BRAND NEW YOUTH THEATRE GROUP FOR 8-13 YEAR OLDS

Milestones Museum in Basingstoke has partnered with Fluid Motion Theatre Company to open a brand new weekly youth theatre for children aged 8-13.

The youth theatre is run by a professional theatre director who teaches children a wide range of skills from improvisation, to mime, puppetry and more. Children have the whole museum as their playground, allowing a brilliant opportunity for them to have fun and make theatre within the streets and amongst the vehicles and exhibits.

The group has only been running for one term and is already hugely popular, prompting a summer school during the holidays. The summer school, which ran from Tuesday 16 – Thursday 18 August, was themed around The Mystery of the Vanishing Queen. Using characters from the exhibition, the group used the trail to bring to life their own story, which took place in various locations around the museum and was performed to both an invited audience and the general public.

Leigh Johnstone, Artistic Director of Fluid Motion Theatre Company said ‘I am so excited about using Milestones to create drama with young people. The museum is already a huge, inspiring stage set and allows us to go on adventures that you wouldn’t normally get to do in a conventional youth theatre group.’

One parent who came to watch the summer school performance said ‘I cannot believe how much they have achieved in three days. The performance was excellent and really professional. My son has had so much fun.’

The Milestones Youth Theatre meets every Friday (during term time) from 3:30pm – 5:00pm and is open to children aged 8-13. The autumn term runs from Friday 9 September – Friday 16 December, and there is no session on Friday 28 October due to half term. The Christmas show will take place in on Saturday 17th December at 2:00pm. 

To find out more details, visit http://www.fluidmotiontheatre.co.uk/youth-theatre.

SCHOOL CHILDREN TO BENEFIT FROM FUNDING BOOST FOR HAMPSHIRE’S BETTER LIFE CHANCES MUSEUM PROJECTS

 

Image courtesy of the Museum of Army Flying

School children in North Hampshire are set to benefit from an £80,000 boost for local museum projects as part of Hampshire Cultural Trust’s Better Life Chances programme.

The funding, from Arts Council England and the Department for Education, will support sustainable relationships between qualifying schools and their local museums to enhance pupils’ education outside the classroom.

Aldershot Military Museum, Basing House and Andover Museum of the Iron Age, all operated and funded by Hampshire Cultural Trust, will develop curriculum-linked projects in order to engage with local schools and the wider community. 

The trust’s partner sites - Winchester Military Museums and the Museum of Army Flying - will also receive funding to deliver educational opportunities.

The cash windfall from Arts Council England and the Department for Education has been awarded to the ‘Reaching Out’ North Hampshire Museum Education Partnership in order to strengthen local networks for the future. 

Janet Owen, chief executive of Hampshire Cultural Trust, welcomed the cash injection for the project, commenting: “We are delighted to receive this funding which will enable our cultural venues to connect positively with schools, families and groups of vulnerable people across Hampshire.

“We have a fantastic wealth of museums in Hampshire, and we look forward to announcing further details of our projects which will help to change the lives of young people for the better.”

 

 

BRINGING ANDOVER'S HERITAGE BACK TO LIFE

Andover has a long and fascinating history, but how much do local people really know about their town?

Actors from the Theatre of Dark Encounters will bring the town’s history alive over four days in August by taking people on a historical tour of the town to mark the official relaunch of the Andover Heritage Trail. The actors will be dressed in period costume and will share stories about how England’s peace with the Vikings was secured, how a scandal in the town’s workhouse led to the reform of the Poor Laws, and how the arrival of the railways affected people living and working in the town.

The tours are free and will take place on Friday 12, 19 and 26 August at 11.30am and 1.30pm and Sunday 21 August at 11am, 1pm and 3pm. They will last around 75 minutes and are suitable for ages eight and over. Tours start at Town Mills and finish at Andover Museum. Tickets must be booked in advance through The Lights Theatre box office or by calling 01264 368368.

The relaunch is part of Test Valley Borough Council’s Four Fun Fridays project, which will see a vibrant programme of street entertainment, live music, creative workshops and competitions for all the family to enjoy each Friday in August.

Leader of the Council, Councillor Ian Carr, said: “The tours will be informative and engaging and give a unique experience for locals, or visitors, to learn more about Andover. We hope they will give people, especially the younger audience, a rare insight into the lives of some of the inhabitants from years gone by when it was one of the most important coaching towns in the south.”

The relaunched Heritage Trail has been made possible through a Heritage Lottery Grant and a partnership between Test Valley Borough Council and Hampshire Cultural Trust.

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